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What Foods Lower Blood Pressure Blood Pressure Control

Foods For High Blood Pressure

by Andrew Williamms on March 25, 2011

Hypertension is considerably dangerous and must be managed appropriately to alleviate further damaging medical conditions. On most occasions, physicians describe medication to control and lower high blood pressure. Unfortunately, the medications sustain excruciating and annoying side effects.

Another meat that you can use is fresh or frozen fish. I would recommend baking and not frying it. You can bake it o the point that it is very flaky. It will super delicious. You can add some herbs to it like thyme and add a bit of lemon splash. Fish meals are excellent foods for high blood pressure.

Spinach, potatoes and soybeans are also high in potassium. So, adding these to your diet could be very helpful for your anti-hypertension campaign. Fresh garlic, while not being known for its high potassium content, is known as an effective blood pressure reducer. Chop it up finely and sprinkle it over your meal and you will get garlic's great benefits without its overbearing taste.

As surprising at it may sound, a common ingredient that we normally store in our kitchen and mix with our foods can actually treat high blood pressure. Garlic contains adenosine which helps relax our muscles. Both cooked and raw garlic benefits to this disorder. But raw garlic is more effective and works quicker compared to the cooked ones. It is also beneficial to those with weight problems for garlic have substances that helps reduces our cholesterol levels. To be able to take advantage of its benefit, take two tablespoons of garlic juice every day. Don't worry about its smell; drinking garlic juice does not result to body odor.

Coriander is a rich resource for calcium, iron, potassium and more. In fact, a tablespoon of dried coriander contains approximately 80 mg of potassium. Because of these nutrients, it's often used to reduce stress and hypertension and serves as an antioxidant and an anti-inflammatory. When combined with fresh curry leaves and consumed as a juice, it's most effective. The recommendation is a full glass three times a day for one to two months, after which you can reduce your intake to two glasses a day.

Potassium regulates sodium levels. Increasing the consumption of potassium rich foods will aid in sodium regulation. Just by eating more fruits and vegetables, not canned and loaded with salt, will improve one's health.

Taking a supplement such as Omega 3 is also helpful. This can be found in many types of fish and salmon, though those are not recommended as food to eat for this because of the high sodium content. You can find out what types of fish are good for your blood pressure by doing a little research.

Changes in diet should accompany changes in lifestyle if you are really serious about lowering blood pressure. You should quit smoking and reduce your consumption of alcohol. You should also exercise at least four or five times every week. Running can be extremely helpful as it makes you sweat and helps to flush out excess water from your body. You should use stairs rather than taking the elevator.

For more information visit us: weight loss tips and foods for high blood pressure and foods that boost energy

Original article published on SooperArticles.com






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How to Lower Your Blood Pressure

For most people, a typical low-salt diet does not alter blood pressure very much. Reducing sodium might help if you can manage to get it to extremely low levels. “The jury is still out on the value of a very aggressive sodium reduction,” Dr. Townsend said.

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